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Communications Chemistry first year anniversary collection

Communications Chemistry published its first articles in March 2018. In this collection, our editors highlight some of their favorite papers from our first year of publishing. This collection also includes all Review and Comment articles published during our first year, including the first in a series of Q&A's that we have commissioned exploring the important relationships  between scientists that go into publishing new research.

Our selected papers celebrate the diversity of our content across the chemical sciences, ranging from articles providing fundamental new chemical insight to applied research and everything in between. Finally, we link to all the 'Behind the Paper' posts published by our authors on the Nature Research Chemistry Community site where our authors tell the stories behind their Communications Chemistry articles. 

About Communications Chemistry

Communications Chemistry is an open access journal from Nature Research publishing high-quality research, reviews and commentary in all areas of the chemical sciences. Research papers published by the journal represent significant advances bringing new insight to a specialized area of research. Read more about the journal here

About the editors

Communications Chemistry is edited by both in-house professional editors and academic Editorial Board Members. Our editors work closely together to ensure the quality of our published papers and consistency in author experience.

Editors' picks

  • Communications Chemistry | Article | open

    Improving the synthesis of crystalline monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides requires insight into domain and boundary structures. Here, the authors produce monolayer rhenium diselenide by chemical vapour deposition onto gold foil, allowing in situ analysis of domain and defect structure.

    • Shaolong Jiang
    • , Min Hong
    • , Wei Wei
    • , Liyun Zhao
    • , Na Zhang
    • , Zhepeng Zhang
    • , Pengfei Yang
    • , Nan Gao
    • , Xiebo Zhou
    • , Chunyu Xie
    • , Jianping Shi
    • , Yahuan Huan
    • , Lianming Tong
    • , Jijun Zhao
    • , Qing Zhang
    • , Qiang Fu
    •  &  Yanfeng Zhang
  • Communications Chemistry | Article | open

    The conversion of carbon dioxide into valuable commodity chemicals is a promising approach to exploit anthropogenic emissions. Here, the authors use carbon-supported iron combined with alkali promoters derived from biomass to convert carbon dioxide directly to heavy linear terminal olefins.

    • Lisheng Guo
    • , Jian Sun
    • , Xuewei Ji
    • , Jian Wei
    • , Zhiyong Wen
    • , Ruwei Yao
    • , Hengyong Xu
    •  &  Qingjie Ge
  • Communications Chemistry | Article | open

    The self-assembly of thermally stable structures in water is a challenge in supramolecular chemistry. Here, cooperativity between weak intramolecular forces allows amphiphiles to associate into cube-shaped assemblies that are thermally stable in water up to 150 °C.

    • Yi-Yang Zhan
    • , Kazuho Ogata
    • , Tatsuo Kojima
    • , Takuya Koide
    • , Kentaro Ishii
    • , Takako Mashiko
    • , Masanori Tachikawa
    • , Susumu Uchiyama
    •  &  Shuichi Hiraoka
  • Communications Chemistry | Article | open

    Displacement of water molecules from proteins can lead to higher affinity or selectivity of ligands, but measuring individual water binding energies is challenging. Here calculated binding free energies are used to estimate the stability of conserved water in 35 bromodomains and to predict the ease of displacement.

    • Matteo Aldeghi
    • , Gregory A. Ross
    • , Michael J. Bodkin
    • , Jonathan W. Essex
    • , Stefan Knapp
    •  &  Philip C. Biggin
  • Communications Chemistry | Article | open

    Obtaining dynamic information on atmospheric aerosol particle size and morphology is typically challenging. Here, the authors introduce holographic imaging of unsupported aerosol particles in air that are spatially confined by optical traps, allowing contact free observation over multiple timescales.

    • Grégory David
    • , Kιvanç Esat
    • , Ioannis Thanopulos
    •  &  Ruth Signorell

Review & Comment

  • Communications Chemistry | Editorial | open

    This month Communications Chemistry celebrates its first anniversary of publishing research, reviews and commentary in all areas of the chemical sciences. Here we look back at the past 12 months of the journal and think about the many things still to achieve.

  • Communications Chemistry | Editorial | open

    This year Peer Review Week takes place between 10th–15th September. Here we acknowledge the contributions of the researchers who have reviewed for Communications Chemistry during our first 12 months and highlight some of our top reviewers.

  • Communications Chemistry | Editorial | open

    Today we launch Communications Chemistry, an open access, multidisciplinary chemistry journal from Nature Research publishing articles, reviews and commentary across the chemical sciences.

  • Communications Chemistry | Q&A | open

    The importance of collaboration and good working relationships is unquestionable in chemistry, and is vital for the effective publication of research articles. In this series of Q&A’s we talk to people involved in all aspects of the process and explore the relationships between them. Here we discuss the mentor-mentee relationship with Professor Gisbert Schneider and Dr Francesca Grisoni (both ETH Zurich).

  • Communications Chemistry | Q&A | open

    The importance of collaboration and good working relationships is unquestionable in our field, and is vital for the effective publication of research articles. In this series of Q&A’s we talk to people involved in all aspects of the process and explore the relationships between them. Here we discuss interactions between authors and reviewers with Professor Jennifer Andexer (University of Freiburg) and Professor Wolfgang Kroutil (University of Graz).

  • Communications Chemistry | Review Article | open

    Three-dimensional covalent organic frameworks are attractive functional materials, although there are fewer examples than their two-dimensional counterparts. Here, the authors review the synthetic approaches yielding these compounds, and highlight key challenges facing researchers in the field.

    • Xingjian Ma
    •  &  Timothy F. Scott